State Secretary’s trip to Ghana was a great success

HHP

July 16, 2021

During his five-day trip to Ghana, State Secretary Tristan Azbej visited the projects supported by the Hungary Helps Program in order to be convinced of their progress directly. The meetings and visits undoubtedly strengthened the fruitful long-term cooperation. Local communities welcomed the Hungarian delegation with folk songs, dances and presentations of their local folk traditions.

Bolgatanga

Hungary Helps

1. Koforidua

The Newill Academy in Koforidua currently has a nursery, a pre-school and a primary school section. It means that the institution provides education for children aged 2-12. The aim of the school management is to offer full primary and secondary education for children up to the age of 18. However, due to the limited number of classrooms, the school used to be overcrowded and some classes had to study outdoors under a tent. The Hungarian aid contributed to the renovation and extension of the school, which made it possible to build two new classrooms in the establishment. The project gives hope to families living in extreme poverty who would otherwise not have the opportunity to educate their children.

Newill Academy

Hungary Helps

The Hungarian delegation in Koforidua

Hungary Helps

2. Accra

The Don Bosco Child Protection Center provides shelter and rehabilitation for street children and young people who were forced to flee their homes. In Ghana, the organisation runs a school and provides vocational training in Ashaiman, thus integrating former street children. The Hungarian support has been used to build a sports center in the institution, which will contribute to the training and social reintegration of the 100 young people living there.

The sports center named after a Hungarian footballer, József Ember

Hungary Helps


Hungary Helps

3. Tamale, Bolgatanga and Soe-Bolgatanga

In the north of Ghana, Muslims constitute a majority of the population. As the north is significantly underdeveloped in comparison with southern Christian provinces, Islamist radicalisation could easily take root among locals. To avoid radicalisation, the country’s Muslim and Christian leaders place particular emphasis on interfaith dialogue and education. There are 346 Christian educational institutions in the Diocese of Navrongo-Bolgatanga in the north. 80% of schools lack most basic school furniture and children often have to study sitting on the floor. The Hungary Helps Program provided 1,500 desks for twenty impoverished primary schools to improve educational conditions. During the trip, the delegation visited two schools with such desks, presenting students with face masks made by Hungarian volunteers in the framework of the Hungary Helps Volunteer Program.

Bolgatanga

Hungary Helps

4. Binduri

In Binduri, in the north, the Hungary Helps Programme supported the training of 1,500 women working in the local economy. The diocese, as project promoter, is helping women to develop their entrepreneurial skills so that they could set up their own small businesses. The women who attended the training were proud to present their products for sale and the skills they had been taught.

Women were proud to present their products for sale

Hungary Helps

5. Wulugu and Guabuliga

In addition to educational infrastructure, health care in rural areas is also underdeveloped, Hospitals, generally overcrowded, are often unable to diagnose patients because the necessary equipment is not available. As a result, two health centers will be built in Wulugu and Guabuliga, which will provide care for around 190,000 local patients. During the visit, State Secretary Tristan Azbej visited the construction site of these new clinics.

Guabuliga

Hungary Helps

Wulugu

Hungary Helps

6. Tamale

In Tamale, State Secretary Tristan Azbej met with the management of the University for Development Studies. He also listened to the report of Hungarian volunteers who are helping in Ghana through the Hungary Helps Volunteer Program. After the meetings, he visited a local eye clinic as well, where Judit Simon, a Hungarian ophthalmologist who has been on mission for several years, reported on her work.

Tamale

Hungary Helps